1 4 2 D O C . 1 6 9 N O V E M B E R 1 9 1 9
as Kroo does, it already makes a difference whether one wants to treat the electron
as having a surface charge or a space charge!! I followed the matter through up to
and including the terms
v4/c4.[10]
Agreement with the experimental data, as Kroo
presents them, became a little better but not as nice as I had hoped. But yesterday
evening I got hold of the new issue of the Physical Review, Oct. 1919, where Duane
and Kang-fuh Hu report their latest determination of the -line of rhodium; the
wavelength corresponds exactly, yes, exactly with my
calculation![11]
So I must be
getting somewhat better experimental data than Kroo used last year. (And what
seems to be emerging is that even in the innermost core of atoms the theory of elec-
trons does not lose its validity. Bohr’s quantum rule seems all the more puzzling.)
We would be extraordinarily pleased, and de Sitter no less than I, if you really
did find occasion during your next trip to Zurich to take a detour to Arosa. There
are so many problems about which I would like to be advised by you. And it cer-
tainly is beautiful up here! I do understand, though, that you will be very busy and
that we must not ask you too insistently, but if you would like to escape the hubbub
of Zurich for a while, then do think of us exiles among the snowy
peaks![12]
I think now I ought not to touch upon the issues raised by thoughts contained in
your letter. Accept my cordial greetings, also on behalf of my
wife[13]
and on behalf
of de Sitter. The latter must stay in bed, unfortunately, but the doctors are satisfied
with his progress. It goes very much to his heart that he cannot support the interests
of his observatory from
here.[14]
I remain yours sincerely,
A. D. Fokker.
P.S. Please do not forget the promised offprints!
169. From Max Planck
Grunewald, 18 November 1919
Dear Colleague,
You are right about the peculiar dual feelings in such experiences as the one just
granted
me.[1]
But what consoled me highly in this case upon receiving your lines
is the cheerfully asserted confidence that fair-mindedness is most firmly grounded
especially among those most qualified to judge; and that makes me truly deeply
happy and grateful.
I am very much looking forward to our time together in
Rostock.[2]
Most cordially yours,
Planck.
Ka1
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