D O C U M E N T S 2 4 0 , 2 4 1 J U N E 1 9 2 2 1 9 7 I fear that a diminishing of the distance between the poles will be of little help because the characteristic in the equilibrium state would then flatten out.[3] But it is certainly worth a try. Thank you very much for repeating the heat-rotation exper- iment. My ponderings about the nature of the terrestrial field got stuck in improbabilities.[4] I am glad that both of you are well. When I can get away for a while, I will hap- pily come with my wife. This wish of hers does have to be fulfilled, one day. Cordial regards to both of you, also from my wife, yours, A. Einstein. 240. To Gustave Le Bon Berlin, den 18. VI. 22 Sir — It is right that my knowledge of the literature is relatively weak, but I always sought to do justice to all authors whose works I knew about.[1] The idea that mass and energy are the only true matter had already been proclaimed by many authors. But it is the theory of relativity alone that allows for true proof of this equivalence. If you would like to write to me about your manner of reasoning (for the formula m ---- ),[2] I would be very grateful to you. Finally, I assure you that crimesE c2 against intellectual property are personal affairs and not national.[3] Very respectfully yours, A. Einstein. 241. To Heinrich Zangger 18 June 1922 Dear friend Zangger, You wrote me affectionately and at length, and some of it I was even—able to read. Don’t take any heed, if [anyone] in Zurich is placing obstacles in your path. You always have pleasure in doing your thing well; it must give you independence from the whole buffoonery into which we have been born. I have largely attained this independence. Worshipped today, scorned or even crucified tomorrow, that is the fate of people whom—God knows why—the bored public has taken possession of. I have as much talent as an organizer as a cow does as a dancer! But if I had