62
EINSTEIN
AS PHYSICS STUDENT
and handbooks of the
time.[12]
But
Weber
also included several
topics
on
which
he
had himself
worked,
using
his
own
published
and
unpublished
results.[13]
Marginal
comments and
queries
in
Einstein's
notes
are possibly
the earliest record
of
his
interest
in
the
nature
of intermolecular
forces
(see
Doc.
37,
notes 94
and
101),
the
subject
of
his first two
published
papers
(Einstein 1901, 1902a).
Beginning
in
1900,
this
topic is
mentioned
frequently
in
his
letters
to
Maric
(see
editorial
note,
"Einstein
on
Molecular
Forces");
and
it
is possible
that
some
of
the
changes
and
marginal
com-
ments, especially
those
in
pencil
or
in
an
ink different from
that
used for the main
text, were
added
at
the time of these letters.
At
least
one
change appears
to be in
Maric's
hand
(see
Doc.
37,
note
117).
Another
surviving
set
of
notes
of
Weber's
course,
taken
by
the mechanical
engi-
neering
student
Emil
Konrad Teucher
(1877-1948),[14] occasionally
includes material
omitted
by
Einstein,
and
in
some cases
shows characteristic
differences: in
general,
Teucher
gives more
detailed derivations and
diagrams
and fuller
explanations
of
experiments,
whereas Einstein
adopts
a
leaner
style,
concentrating
on
concise
state-
ments
of
results.
Einstein's
notes,
as
preserved, begin
in
the middle of
the first semester
and end
shortly
before the
course
did
on
27
July 1898.[15]
Teucher's
notes
open
with
a
section
on
the ideal
gas
(where
thermometry
and
barometry
are
also
discussed),
followed
by one on
calorimetry.
The third section
is
devoted
to
heat
conduction,
one
of Weber's research interests.
In
the
course
of
dis-
cussing
various methods
for
determining
the
coefficient
of heat conduction
experi-
mentally,
Weber
derives
and
solves
Fourier's heat-conduction
equation
for the
spher-
ically
symmetric
case.
Einstein's
notes
begin
at
this
point.
[12]
See,
e.g.,
Wüllner
1896,
1897;
Winkelmann
1893b,
1896.
[13]
Weber did basic research
on
heat
con-
duction,
the anomalous
temperature
depen-
dence of certain
specific
heats,
and the
energy
distribution
law
for black
body radiation;
he
did
applied
research
on
AC
circuits,
electrical
lighting,
and the standardization of electrical
units
(see
Weiss
1912).
For
an
account
of
Weber's activities
during
the 1897-1898
aca-
demic
year,
see
his
"Bericht über
die Thätig-
keit
der
Abtheilungen
des
physikalischen
In-
stituts.
.
.während
des
Schuljahrs
1898"
(SzZE
Schulratsarchiv,
1899).
For
evidence
of Ein-
stein's
familiarity
with
Weber's
research
on
heat
conduction,
see
Doc.
111.
[14]
Teucher's
notes
(SzZE Bibliothek,
Hs
32) are
the
only
other known record of
Weber's
physics
course
for
1897-1898.
Sig-
nificant
differences
between Einstein's and
Teucher's
notes
are
annotated.
[15] Omitted from Einstein's
notes
are
the
topics
at
the end of the
course:
the
theory
of
the
galvanometer,
its
use
in
measuring
the
earth's
magnetic
field,
and the electrical
equiv-
alent of
heat.
Einstein
was
clearly
aware
of
the
topics
covered
in
the
early
part
of the
course
(see
Doc.
39);
the
extant notes start
on
the
first
page
of
a
notebook,
and
it
is possible
that
notes for
the
beginning
of the
course
were
recorded
elsewhere.
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