xxviii
GENERAL INTRODUCTION
for the fate of
his
papers
dates from
1921,
when he
agreed
to
give
his
corre-
spondence
to
the Prussian State
Library
for
its
collection of scientists'
papers.
During
the
twenties, some
effort
was
made to
save
manuscripts, typescripts,
and
correspondence.
In
1928
Miss Dukas
came
to
work for him
and
began
to
preserve
his
papers
more
systematically.
But
even
then,
not
everything
he
wrote
was
kept.
Einstein continued
to
write
many
letters
by hand,
and
copies
of
typed
letters
were
not
always
retained. He
gave manuscripts
to friends and
donated
some
to
charities;
certain items
were
stolen. The
flourishing
trade
in
Einstein
autographs
further
dispersed
his
papers,
but
it also resulted
in
the
preservation
of
many
items.
Shortly
after the Nazis
came
to
power,
Einstein's
papers
were
sent out
of
Berlin
by
Rudolf
Kayser,
his
son-in-law,
with
the
help
of
the
French
Embassy.
Virtually everything
was
saved and
brought to
Einstein's home
in
Princeton,
New
Jersey,
where it remained until
well
after his death.
Einstein's
will, signed
in
1950, provided
for the eventual
donation
of
his
papers
to
The Hebrew
University
of Jerusalem.
After his
death,
Miss Dukas
and Professor Gerald Holton of
Harvard
University developed
a
plan
for
organizing, cataloging,
and
annotating
the collection and for
enlarging
it
by
acquiring copies
of
missing
items.
The
reorganized
material
was
gradually
transferred
from Einstein's
home to the Institute for Advanced
Study
in
Princeton
to
constitute the Einstein
Archive.
Some
private papers
not
trans-
ferred
to
the Archive
were recently bequeathed
to
The
Hebrew
University
of
Jerusalem under
a separate agreement.
This material
is still not
available.
Under
Miss
Dukas's
supervision
and
with
the
help
of
a
number of scholars
over
the
next two
decades,
the Einstein Archive
grew
to its
present
dimensions.
In
1982
the Archive
was
transferred
to
the
Manuscript
Division of
the
Jewish
National and
University Library
at
The Hebrew
University
in
Jerusalem.
The Archive forms the
primary
documentary
basis for this edition. After
the
establishment
of the Einstein
Office in 1977 to
prepare
the
papers
for
publication, a
full-sized
duplicate
of each document
was
made for editorial
use.
An
extensive and
systematic
search for additional documents
began
and
will
continue. We
now
have
about
one
thousand
non-correspondence
items,
about nine thousand letters from
Einstein,
and
about
thirteen thousand letters
to
Einstein,
in addition to
several thousand
third-party
letters
(neither to
nor
from
Einstein)
and other documents. Current
holdings
and the
rate at
which
we are
adding
documents to
our
collection
suggest an
edition
of
thirty or
more
volumes.
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